French artist Justin Morin presents a new installation made possible by its collaboration with Swiss company 4Spaces Textile. In the continuity of its previous works, he has created a minimal and colorful installation composed of four curtains. But unlike the silk draperies that he’s developing since six years, this new ensemble is made of printed tulle, a fabric that has its own qualities, combining both chromatic brilliance and resistance. Thanks to 4Spaces’ savoir-faire and technical innovation, the scales of the piece is ambitious. Justin Morin explains : “I love silk for its sensuality, but it’s also a quite fragile textile. I really wanted to explore further the relation between my work and the architecture that welcomes it. Tulle is perfect because it’s very modern and it allows me to develop bigger projects. I was amazed to discover that it was possible to obtain this quality in terms of colors, the process is incredible”.
The artist defines his drapery works as “a sensitive reinterpretations of souvenirs”. Based on iconic elements taken from the entertainment industry (from fashion to tourism by way of music or cinema), his installations give sculptural forms to blurred memories where colors are the only remaining elements.


For Design Collective, Morin developed a project inspired by the movie Mishima : A Life in Four Chapters by Paul Schrader. Each curtains reflecting the different parts of the film. “I really admire this movie, it’s a stunning visual piece elaborated by Eiko Ishioka. I love the construction of the film, it’s a brilliant idea to have created movies within the movie. Obviously, it’s a great introduction for anyone who doesn’t know Yukio Mishima’s story. But I also admire the movie for its production complexity: it’s impressive to realize that Schrader elaborated a project about an author that is still considered taboo in its own country. He directed a crew that doesn’t speak his language. If the movie is a must-see, the making-of documentary is a great art and life lesson”.
The pieces are entitled as follows : “how to screen Mishima, a life in four chapters”, “how to screen the Temple of the Golden Pavillion”, “how to screen Kyoko’s House” and “how to screen the Runaway Horses”.

Born in 1979, Justin Morin is represented by Capital Gallery (San Francisco) and Last Resort (Copenhagen). Based in Paris, he’s also working as set designer on special projects for clients like Louis Vuitton, Rimowa or Carven.

The textile development and production of the installation is sponsored by 4Spaces Textiles Zurich, Switzerland. , creative director 4Spaces. :
To realize Justin Morin’s art installation, over 100meters of a special double width fabric were used, split into 4 large individual panels with each representing an individual sequence of art. The production was challenged with large formats, the longest panel being 38 meters (42 yards) using the artwork in its original size. The final choice of the fabric quality was selected between Justin and 4Spaces to have a different language to Justin’s silk pieces and transmit a new industrially handmade approach. To print on such a refined quality of Tulle represents the highest skills in Italian production, with 4 people feeding the fabric by hand into each panel production. After each artwork was produced, the machines had to be calibrated to ensure the brilliance and authenticity of the colors which were demanded by the artist.”

 

More information on 4Spaces can be found on TOPHOTELSUPPLIER,  the specialized service provider in the exchange of cutting-edge information of hotel construction in the international hospitality industry.

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